One More Nintendo Direct Coming This Year According To Nintendo CEO

Since the tragic news of Satoru Iwata’s passing in July, the company has gone silent with it’s Nintendo Direct presentations it skewed out on a regular basis. These recorded events brought fans all over the world smile not only with exciting content that would be coming to Wii U and 3DS, but seeing all the well-recognized faces in Japan as Mr. Miyamoto and Mr. Iwata with occasional appearances by Reggie Fils-Aime or Satoru Shibata depending the region you resided in.

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that at least one more Nintendo Direct presentation would be coming out this year. While there will be one less familiar face in these presentations, we’ll still feel the spirit the rest of the crew at the Big N has to offer. Now, who’s going to take charge of the presentation is unknown. It’ll be likely from a few familiar faces landing in the stream, but we’ll just have to find out until that day.

The Ninty Times 12 Favorite Moments of 2014 [Number 12]: Reggie vs. Iwata

Were counting down our 12 favorite moments of 2014 here at The Ninty Times and to start of, we’re showcasing these two widely recognized figures at Nintendo. We start of with Reggie Fils-Aime vs Satoru Iwata. Both of these giants were bound to fight someday and why not settle tensions on Smash? Yes sir, not only did they do this during the E3 Nintendo Direct, but they also revealed Mii’s would be usable in Super Smash Bros. for 3DS/Wii U and Amiibo’s could be used in the game. Our bodies weren’t ready for this announcement.

Iwata Shares His Final Project As a Programmer Before Becoming Nintendo CEO, Discuess How Meele Came To The Market in Time

The game fans and fierce competitors love known as Super Smash Bros. Meele, might of not been a title you would of been playing on Gamecube launch day. It was down to one genius man who thrived to the maximum with the Gamecube needing a super stellar known franchise such as Smash Bros. to be a day 1 title. And as history tells, it was accomplished. But how so?

Current Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata sat with 4gamer for an interview revealing how this happened. You can find Mr. Iwata;s comments below and how he nearly debugged the final phases of the game by himself.

Kawakami: Alright, changing topics now, Mr. Iwata – you were originally a ‘Super Programmer’, weren’t you?

Iwata: Umm. Well, actually…I don’t feel like I can say that, I’ve never said that actually. I don’t think I was really ‘super’ by today’s standards(laughs).

Kawakami: Well, there was definitely a period when other people thought that about you, though, right? When you were at HAL Labs, for example.

Iwata: I guess there was. There was definitely a period of time after I began working at HAL when I sort of fancied myself to be the most proficient software engineer in the video games industry. Because I believed things like that I could write better NES code than even Nintendo’s (EAD) engineers or that I could write the fastest, most compact code.

Kawakami: But once you move from a engineering position to one of management or administration, you’re no longer writing code yourself, are you?

Iwata: That’s right.

Kawakami: So, wouldn’t that make you long for it? Like, would you be wondering “should I be a manager or should I keep writing code”? Did you have that sort of internal struggle, Mr. Iwata?

Iwata: Hmm. Actually, in my case, I kept on writing code. Until I was 40.

4Gamer: Wait, really?

Iwata: Yes. Of course, I couldn’t write code during the week days, but, well, my nights were my own, as they say. Or, I’d take work home on my days off and write code there. If I made anything cool, I’d bring it in to work on Monday to show it to everyone and they’d all be glad to look at it and that was fun for me.

Kawakami: Wow!

Iwata: Of course, the company wouldn’t run if I didn’t do my managerial tasks during the day, so I did them. But I didn’t quit writing code.

Kawakami: Ah, so, what was you’re last job as an engineer, then?

Iwata: Aaah, I wonder if it’s alright to admit this? Well, I guess the proverbial statute of limitations is up, so I’ll tell you, but my actual last work on programming happened when I was working as the General Manager of Corporate Planning at Nintendo. Something happened and the Gamecube version of Super Smash Brothers didn’t look like it was going to make its release date so I sort of did a code review for it (Wry Laugh).

All: (Laugh Loudly)

Kawakami: No matter how you look at it, that’s not the job of the General Manager of Corporate Planning, is it? (Laughs)

Iwata: Yes, it isn’t really, is it (wry laugh). At the time, I went to HAL Labs in Yamanashi and was the acting head of debugging. So, I did the code review, fixed some bugs, read the code and fixed more bugs, read the long bug report from Nintendo, figured out where the problem was and got people to fix those…all in all I spent about three weeks like that. And, because of that, the game made it out on time.

Kawakami:So you even did the debugging yourself!

Iwata: And that was the last time that I worked as an engineer ‘in the field’. I was right there, sitting by programmers, in the trenches, reading code together, finding the bugs, and fixing them together.

Kawakami: That is such an interesting story. But with that being the last time you worked as an engineer, does it mean that there’s a knowledge gap between you and people who are currently working as ones?

Iwata: Yes, stepping back from something means that a knowledge gap is inevitable. Even if I understand the principles, I just can’t take the time to fully update my skills. So, with time, I’ve found myself having to ask what certain things are.
So, even though I’m looking over the system development departments, I find myself having to ask them to explain certain things to me. Through that I’m sort of struggling through trying to not let my judgements standards waste away.

Kawakami: So that’s an on-going thing, then?

Iwata: Yes, of course. How do I put this? I, personally, don’t want to lose my position as the ‘CEO of a listed company in Japan with the most knowledge of programming’.

All: (Laugh loudly)

Recommended Software System coming next year for each NNID

As more translated news emerges from the investor’s meeting that took place last week, we are now getting a better understatement on what Nintendo plans on doing with Nintendo Network ID’s.

According to the translation of the investors meeting, Nintendo plans to implement some kind of ‘Recommended Software‘ system, which recommends games you may be interested in, giving the ease to find games you may enjoy with a better probability. Satoru Iwata expressed customers might of played a game with similarity, so “game A and game B, and so the probability they’ll enjoy game C is very high.” Here’s Mr. Iwata’s full comments from the investor’s meeting.


First, as you’ve kindly pointed out, the generation that has paid more attention to Nintendo 3DS because of “Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS” is also the generation that makes the most use of social media, and thanks to them sharing the game’s appeal with others, we have gotten off to a good start with “Super Smash Bros.,” which has shown how hot it is by surpassing industry sales expectations for a Nintendo 3DS “Super Smash Bros.” title. This is also connected to pre-orders for “Pokémon Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire,” and there is a similar trend overseas. Additionally, “Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire” for the Game Boy Advance was a “Pokémon” game that created very deep, emotional memories for those who played it, and it is the reason that people have thought to themselves, “I’m not familiar with the recent “Pokémon” titles, but I’d definitely like to try this.” This high level of active use has occurred at a time when there are so many other interesting titles for Nintendo 3DS, so we must consider what titles to offer next to those who’ve played and enjoyed “Pokémon Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire” or “Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS.” Thanks to information from sources like Club Nintendo, we have some idea of the answers to questions like “What games are correlated with other games?” and “What aspects appeal to certain consumer age groups?” Among these consumers, there are some who had not played with dedicated video game systems for some time, so when we offer them the next game after “Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS” and “Pokémon Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire,” I think whether these new games will be able to keep them using their Nintendo 3DS or not will be really critical. However, with regard to these concerns, our systems, be it Nintendo 3DS or Wii U, have become quite effective at interacting digitally and sharing new information with consumers. We would like to use those systems to rapidly offer options like, “How about playing this game next?” to people of that generation where we have seen usage increase. In January, I said that for the next platform, we would like to skillfully combine dedicated video game systems and smart devices, and unify them all under the Nintendo Network ID system. So for example, one of the targets we’re aiming to achieve next year is, through the Nintendo Network ID, being able to offer options tailored to individual consumers based on the fact that they’ve played game A and game B, and so the probability they’ll enjoy game C is very high. We would like very much to work towards that.

Iwata gives an insight of Nintendo’s support for mobile devices

CEO of Nintendo, Satoru Iwata, recently had the opportunity to speak to many investors on what the future lies for the Japanese giant. With the text officially translated into English, we know have a better understanding on what exactly was mentioned.

Satoru Iwata recently spoke about Nintendo’s future regarding smartphone, and him mentioned the recently announced Mii app coming to smart devices in 2015. Here’s Iwata’s full comments below.

Basically, Nintendo’s utilization of smart devices means to “make a stronger bond with our consumers through the use of smart devices,” instead of to “do business directly on smart devices.” We are continuously considering what we should do and what we can do to achieve that goal. Although this is not directly related to the application (for smart devices) you are referring to, even now if you access Nintendo’s Japanese website from a smart device, it is not in a layout for smart devices. It is rather embarrassing that we are so behind on this compatibility, but we plan to optimize our Japanese website for smart devices within 2014. In addition, we opened a website called “Play Nintendo” in the U.S. this month that introduces Nintendo characters to children and their parents, assuming that many of them will access it from their smart devices. This website is available at play.nintendo.com (please use the newest browser), so please take a look if you are interested. This service is currently only available in the U.S., but Mr. Miyamoto and I would like to make this kind of service available on a global scale.

The application under development that I said we would like to release within this year at the Corporate Management Policy Briefing in January is one that utilizes Mii on smart devices. I think many people know what a Mii is, but they are virtual characters users can create on Nintendo video game systems that appear in games and resemble the user, or their family or friends. We introduced Mii with the release of Wii, and now you can use them on Wii U and Nintendo 3DS. Using Mii becomes more interesting as the Mii population expands and as more interesting look-alike Mii are made. They appear in “Super Smash Bros. for Wii U” and “Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS.” Many consumers have enjoyed playing “StreetPass Mii Plaza,” and “Tomodachi Life” is a game that would not have been developed if Mii did not exist. It can be said that Mii was originally born in the development process of “Tomodachi Collection” (Japanese title) for Nintendo DS. I showed it to Mr. Miyamoto and asked him, “Isn’t this what you wanted to create?” since I had heard that he wanted to do something similar to this. If we were able to expand the Mii population and Mii were usable on consumers’ smart devices, for example, if consumers were able to create their profile icons on social media using Mii, we believe consumers would be happy, and we are developing something like it now. However, it is clear that the main pillars of this year-end sales season for us will be the “Super Smash Bros.” and “Pokémon” games, and when we started designing the Mii application, we realized that by refining various elements, we could end up with a better final product, so we decided that we should release it when we are confident it is capable of making a solid bond with our consumers. When Nintendo first releases its application for smart devices, I believe that many people will be interested in it enough to try it. In order to make the most of this opportunity, instead of releasing it within this year when we feel there is still room for improvement, we would like to release a more polished version. We are positive that we can make a stronger bond with our consumers using Mii, and that our consumers will enjoy and activate the application from time to time if such an application is created, but we would like to release it next year, instead of this year.

Satoru Iwata won’t make an appearance at E3 this year

Health issues take a role in his absence

Satoru Iwata, CEO of Nintendo, won’t be making an appearance to this year’s E3 event due to health constraint’s. Speaking to Polygon, a Nintendo representative told Polygon that Mr. Iwata won’t be at the expo this year in the Los Angeles Convention Center in California. Here’s what the Nintendo representative told Polygon:

 

“He’s been instructed by his physician not to travel overseas in the immediate future, and so he will not be making the trip to Los Angeles. Please understand that it is business as usual for Mr. Iwata, and he continues his normal duties as president of Nintendo Co., Ltd. while he remains in Japan. As always, he will be actively involved in all of Nintendo’s activities at the show”

 

Sounds like the problem isn’t major, since he can still work normally, the only thing is he just won’t be able to attended this year’s show. Miyamoto as well as many Nintendo of America workers will be making an appearance to the show also. Are you going to miss Iwata’s “Please understand” phrase said by him? Hopefully, Mr. Iwata can have a speedy recovery on his health issues.

Mario Kart releasing worldwide this May

Image It was announced late Wednesday during the investors meeting in Japan where Satoru Iwata maid many announcements and gave statistical figures. One of the big news was that Nintendo’s go-kart racer for the Wii U, Mario Kart 8, is set to release worldwide during the month of May. No specific date was given apart from the month, but the game should release in every territory approximately at around the same day.

Satoru Iwata also mentioned how the last previous 2 installments have been selling from April 1 2013- December 31 2013. Mr. Iwata mentioned both game have combined sales of “over 1 million” during the time period specified.

Pokemon X and Y have now reached 11.61 million sales worldwide and other milestones for Nintendo

ImageAfter today’s 2013 3Q financial results, President and CEO of Nintendo has mentioned that the first Pokemon series installments Pokemon X and Y have sold 11.61 units sold. Other 3DS titles were also mentioed, mentioning the lifetime sales of some games. Here are the 3DS game sales that were provided by Nintendo:

 

3DS

  • Pokemon X and Y – 11.61 million sales
  • Tomodachi Collection – 1.82 million sales
  • Animal Crossing: New Leaf – 3.52 million sales (2.79 million in North America and Europe)
  • Mario and Luigi: Dream Team – 2 million sales (1.54 million in North America and Europe)
  • The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds – 2.18 million sales (1.85 million in North America and Europe)

 

Nintendo also provided information for the Wii U, including The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD. Here’s what Nintendo provided for Wii U titles

Wii U

  • Super Mario 3D World – “over 1 million sold”
  • The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD – “over 1 million sold”
  • Wii Party U – “over 1 million sold”

What are your impressions on the figures? Do you believe Nintendo will continue with success with its first-party titles?

Pokemon X and Y have now reached 11.61 million sales worldwide and other milestones for Nintendo

ImageAfter today’s 2013 3Q financial results, President and CEO of Nintendo has mentioned that the first Pokemon series installments Pokemon X and Y have sold 11.61 units sold. Other 3DS titles were also mentioed, mentioning the lifetime sales of some games. Here are the 3DS game sales that were provided by Nintendo:

 

3DS

  • Pokemon X and Y – 11.61 million sales
  • Tomodachi Collection – 1.82 million sales
  • Animal Crossing: New Leaf – 3.52 million sales (2.79 million in North America and Europe)
  • Mario and Luigi: Dream Team – 2 million sales (1.54 million in North America and Europe)
  • The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds – 2.18 million sales (1.85 million in North America and Europe)

 

Nintendo also provided information for the Wii U, including The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD. Here’s what Nintendo provided for Wii U titles

Wii U

  • Super Mario 3D World – “over 1 million sold”
  • The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD – “over 1 million sold”
  • Wii Party U – “over 1 million sold”

What are your impressions on the figures? Do you believe Nintendo will continue with success with its first-party titles?